Rth Rising Series

My Rth Rising series is coming to an end. Rth Home  is available for pre-order and will go live on February 1. This is a science fiction/colonialization story that takes a slight paranormal twist. Hey, it’s my world! (Rth Rising is on sale for $.99 through January)

Rth Rising banner

In the first book, Rth Rising, Kat struggles with the restrictions of living under Puter—the computer that governs the colony, as Davd helps with the underground escape from the arcologies.

In the second book, Rth Claimed, the sabotage of Puter is uncovered and Castra, Kat’s aunt along with her protégé, attempt to correct the damage done and keep the colony viable.

Now in the third book, Rth Home, Ralt, Davd’s uncle coordinates true colonization. The exploration of the planet can finally begin, revealing things about the world they never knew.

Hope you’re having a great 2020!!

 

 

Happy Holidays!

Taking a short moment to wish you and your family a wonderful Christmas, Yule, Hanukah, and Kwanza. I hope 2019 was all you wanted and that 2020 will be even better!

      

It’s been a good year for me and a lot of that was due to you guys, reading and checking out my books—the best year I’ve ever had for selling my stories and I want to thank you! For 2020 I already know of two releases, both in the science fiction realm. The third and last book in the Rth Rising Series will release on February 1- Rth Home. And on April 15 (not tax day in my mind, but my 41st wedding anniversary!!) A New Time – the third and last book in the Guardians of Now Series will release. I know that Rth Home will be on Booksprout with some ARC copies available for review if you’d like a free read!

Don’t have the cover for A New Time yet, but here’s Rth Home.

Rth Home Cover - 6X9

Please be careful in your holiday travels, indulge judiciously and please meet me back here in January for some more supernatural works!

 

 

Celebrating Yule

I went online to do some research for my latest book and I’m going to share that information this month. It all borders on the supernatural and explains a lot of our traditions for this time of year. Yule is celebrated at the Midwinter Solstice, which is the shortest day of the year. Yule comes from the Germanic “Jul” and means “Wheel.” At Yule, we celebrate winter and the rebirth of the Sun, as it’s the day the sun (and light) begin to return and days to grow longer.

At Yule, we mourn the passing of the Old God who is the Lord of Winter.  This ancient God has many names, including Cernunnos, Odin, Harlequin, and Santa Claus. This God is portrayed as an old man, majestic and often jolly. Sometimes He is shown as a King in ermine-trimmed robes, other times He is shown as a Jester and called the King of Fools. The Old God is the Lord of Death and of the Spirit World and magic. He is the God of the forest, of animals, and of the hunt. Often, He is shown with antlers or horns.

This is a time of new beginnings both physically and spiritually, the wheel of the year has made a complete circle. The darkest night of winter is considered a good time for self-examination and discovering the “seeds” of spiritual growth or hindrance which are lying dormant within us.

The Yule moon of December is the only moon of the year that’s almost consistently claimed by the forces of light on Earth. A full moon whose metaphysical energies are dominated by the Spirit of Christmas as directed by the delightful demi-angel Santa Clause. This full moon is said to cause a peaceful effect.

Here are some of the superstitions –

December is the only month that traditions say older werewolves don’t transform and younger one become white and gentle.

Vampires beyond the 4th generation lose the urge for blood and younger ones become human during the time the moon is completely full.

Alfaheimr the land of Elves was inhabited by spirits who created the Sun. Including Elves in Yule ritual encourages them to rejuvenate the Sun and make it shine again.

Evergreens trees remained green throughout the winter they were thought to have power over death and could defeat winter demons roaming the earth and urge the coming of the Sun.

The vibrant green leaves and bright red berries of holly appear during the winter to symbolize rebirth.

Homes and holiday trees were decorated with candles to frighten away unwanted spirits and to encourage the Sun to shine.

To the Druids, the white berries of mistletoe symbolized semen of the Gods and was used to bring fertility and abundance. Hung over the doorway it protects from thunder, lightning and malicious evil.

 

In Holiday in Maine, my shifters have gathered to celebrate Yule. Please join them!

    

Ghoulies, Ghosties and Vampires, Oh My!

pumpkin in chairIt’s that time of year when the veil is thin and the eerie takes over. Halloween originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and disguise themselves with costumes to ward off ghosts. To outsmart these ghostly beings, people would put on masks when they left their homes after dark so that the ghosts would think they were fellow spirits.

That jack o’lantern you have on your porch dates back to the Celts. As part of their autumnal celebration, they wanted to light the way to their homes for the good spirits, so they carved faces into vegetables such as turnips and squash.

tombstone in treeThe Pilgrims banned the celebrating of Halloween in American due to its pagan roots. In fact, Halloween wasn’t celebrated here until 1845. One of the reasons for its resurgence here was the immigration of the Irish due to the Potato Famine of 1845-46 bringing the Druid holiday with them.

I admit, I love that so many of our traditions such as Halloween, Christmas and Easter come from pagan roots. They’ve been changed slightly, and most people are unaware of the origins, but I know and secretly smile.

If you’re into the eerie or mysterious, check out Before You or Learning Trust or Wraith’s Heart – with just a touch of the unexplained.

Before-you-flat-med-reso    Learning Trust cover for Amazon    Wraith's Heart final 6x9

Autumnal Equinox 2019

Fall is coming! Finally, the heat will break (hopefully), the world will turn bright colors and nature gets ready to hibernate. We get the Autumnal Equinox or Mabon. It starts getting dark earlier and there’s a spookiness that comes into being. You might want to look over your shoulder occasionally. Yes, it’s my favorite season of the year.

I’m celebrating this Fall with a new paranormal, shifter book. Budapest Fairy Tale is a story in the continuing Conall Clan series. It drops October 5. Having never planned to write shifters (or vampires) I found I’ve really enjoyed creating my own world with this. Yes, there are some werewolf myths that I’d tried to adhere to, but mainly these characters are the way I want that world to be. Just a little removed from the normal world, with many intersections. Marcel, who you met in book two–Family Ties—demanded his own book, and who was I to deny him. I’m working on another one after that. Yes, this different paranormal world on the fringes of “normal” really drew me in.

You already know how I love the paranormal. It’s always my go to first for reading and as we head into the end of the year, I recommend it highly. It’s the time of year to read Duma Key by Stephen King, or something by Heather Graham, or JR Ward, or Lara Adrian. Ghosts and things that go bump in the night are coming. No, it’s not Halloween yet but we’re headed that way.

I’d love recommendations from you on your favorites. So the TBR pile will grow some more, at least I’ll never get bored!

Happy Autumn!

Devil’s Hoof Prints

One more legend from North Carolina and again, I have seen this one. Hey, I’ve lived in NC for all but 7 years of my life! My mother grew up in Little Washington, NC, which is near Bath so of course when we visited relatives this was one of the stops. I have no photos from our trips of this so I had to search for some.

Devil’s Horse’s Hoof Prints near Bath are a series of small, saucer-shaped depressions that have been there since 1813. Measuring four to five inches deep with sloping sides from six to ten inches, the holes remain one of North Carolina’s most famous and enduring mysteries. There are pine needles all around the place because it’s at the edge of a wooded area and it wasn’t exactly well maintained like a park, but the holes were easily discernable.

The legend goes that on a Sunday morning about church time, Jesse Elliott and some companions planned to race their horses along the main street of Bath. Elliott mounted and spurred his horse, and as it raced off, he leaned forward shouting in its ear: “Take me in a winner or take me to Hell.” Promptly the horse dug its hooves into the soft earth, throwing Elliot against a tree and killing him instantly. So of course some believed that the horse was actually the devil in the form of a horse.

I also found this account in my research – “Actually, he was on his way to a race and was riding along side another man also headed to the race. This other man was mounted upon a very large black horse and was wearing all black with a hat to make his face invisible. Elliott challenged him to a little race on the way to the actual race and as he was passed by the man on the black horse, Elliott’s horse flew into a tree killing both instantly. There is no record of anyone with a straight black horse (no markings whatsoever) at the race. People have also tried to cover the tracks with cement, but nothing worked. They also used to charge admission but now it is free and open to the public.” Attributed to “Sam”

Tradition maintains that the holes, located just off N.C. 1334, about 3 miles west of Bath, have survived every known attempt to permanently eradicate or alter them. No vegetation grows inside them and none of the pine needles surrounding the holes ever remain in the prints. For years, kids have tried to cover them or fill them in only to find that the holes are empty again upon their next visit. I’d never heard about the cement before. Tons of visitors to the site have experienced the same phenomena, and yes, I was one of them. I didn’t get to go back and see if my pine needles were gone but the prints were still there the next visit I made.

Is it any wonder I love writing about the paranormal – such possibilities!! Click on the covers for more information.

   

Lydia’s Bridge

I talked about the Brown Mountain Lights last month. This month I thought I’d mention “Lydia’s Bridge.” It’s not far from where I live and I’ve driven by it many times. The road has been moved, so cars no longer go that way, but it’s easy enough to see from the new route.

The story goes that on some rainy nights a young woman in a white party dress flags down a car and asks to be taken home. She gets into the backseat and gives directions to her home. The driver heads that way but when they arrive, she has vanished from the car.

When the driver goes to the door, to find if she jumped out and to make sure she’s okay, he’s told that she was killed while walking along the road back in the 1920’s and has been trying to get home ever since. (Here’s where I admit that back when I was writing X-Files fanfic, I used this legend for one of my stories- The Girl Under the Bridge)

I wrote a ghost story after I went pro as well – check out Wraith’s Heart